Arrest Types and Co-occurring Disorders in Persons with Schizophrenia or Related Psychoses

Abstract  
This study examined the patterns of criminal arrest and co-occurring psychiatric disorders among individuals with schizophrenia
or related psychosis that were receiving public mental health services and had an arrest history. Within a 10-year period,
65% of subjects were arrested for crimes against public order, 50% for serious violent crimes, and 45% for property crimes.
The presence of any co-occurring disorder increased the risk of arrest for all offense categories. For nearly all offense
types, antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders conferred the greatest increase in risk for arrest. Among
anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with a greater risk of arrest for serious violent crimes
but not other offense types. Criminal risk assessments and clinical management in this population should focus on co-occurring
antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders in addition to other clinical and non-clinical factors.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Pages 1-14
  • DOI 10.1007/s11414-011-9269-4
  • Authors
    • Patrick J. McCabe, Center for Mental Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
    • Paul P. Christopher, Center for Mental Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
    • Nicholas Druhn, Minnesota State Operated Forensic Services, 100 Freeman Drive, St. Peter, MN 56082, USA
    • Kristen M. Roy-Bujnowski, Center for Mental Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
    • Albert J. Grudzinskas, Center for Mental Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
    • William H. Fisher, Center for Mental Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, USA
Share and enjoy:
This entry was posted in Journal Article Abstracts. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.